Schedule


The Oslo 2019 ISHPSSB meeting starts on Sunday 7 July with social events such as welcome speeches, reception with soft drinks and finger food, museum tours and film viewings at The Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology. The last day of the meeting will be Friday 12 July with half-day of presentations and special tours in Oslo after the end of the program.

7

July

Sunday

  • 08:00

  • 09:00

  • 10:30
  • 11:00

  • 12:30

  • 15:00

    Registration Opening

  • 18:00

    Welcome Reception & Social Events

8

July

Monday

  • 08:00
    Registration
  • 09:00

    Parallel Sessions 1

  • 10:30

    Coffee Break

  • 11:00

    Parallel Sessions 2

  • 12:30

    Lunch Break & Meetings

  • 14:30

    Parallell Sessions 3

  • 16:00
    Coffee Break
  • 16:30

    Parallel Sessions 4

  • 18:30

    Public Lecture Fern Wickson

9

July

Tuesday

  • 08:00
    Registration
  • 09:00

    Parallel Sessions 5

  • 10:30

    Coffee Break

  • 11:00

    Parallel Sessions 6

  • 12:30

    Lunch Break & Meetings

  • 14:30

    Parallell Sessions 7

  • 16:00
    Coffee Break
  • 16:30

    Keynote Gísli Pálsson

  • 18:00

    Mixed Media & Poster Session

10

July

Wednesday

  • 08:00
    Registration
  • 09:00

    Parallel Sessions 8

  • 10:30

    Coffee Break

  • 11:00

    Parallel Sessions 9

  • 12:30

    Lunch Break & Meetings

  • 14:30

    Parallell Sessions 10

  • 16:00
    Coffee Break
  • 16:30

    Parallel Sessions 11

11

July

Thursday

  • 08:00
    Registration
  • 09:00

    Parallel Sessions 12

  • 10:30

    Coffee Break

  • 11:00

    Parallel Sessions 13

  • 12:30

    Lunch Break & Meetings

  • 14:30

    Parallell Sessions 14

  • 16:00

    General Meeting & Awards Ceremony

  • 19:00

    Conference Dinner

12

July

Friday

  • 08:00
    Registration
  • 09:00

    Parallel Sessions 15

  • 10:30

    Coffee Break

  • 11:00

    Parallel Sessions 16

  • 12:30

    Lunch Break & Meetings

  • 14:30

    Excursions in & around Oslo

Keynote speakers


Fern Wickson

Fern Wickson

Lessons Learned from Waterfleas, Whales and Bees: 

A journey into environmental controversies in the search for sustainable food

Ecology seeks to understand how organisms interact with their environment. It is a biological science that looks at how things are interconnected, how they interrelate. I am an ecologist interested in how we, the human species, interact with our environment. My work is transdisciplinary; researching the human/nature relationship through overlapping lens of biological science, ecological ethics and environmental politics. In this talk I will present some of the lessons I have learned about how ethics and politics are entangled in the science of environmental harm. These are lessons I have learned from working with waterfleas, whales and bees.

How we feed ourselves, as a species, is one of the foundational ways we construct and conduct our interaction with nature/the environment/our ecological community. It is a key mode of entry into our relationship with the rest of life on Earth. Today there is increasing recognition that modern industrial food systems have created extensive environmental damage and there is an urgent quest to find sustainable solutions. In this quest though, certain technologies and practices generate intense socio-political controversy over their role in a sustainable future. 

This presentation will explore two such sustainable food controversies: genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in agriculture and the hunting of whales and seals in the North Atlantic. Through my ongoing engagement with these issues, I will demonstrate how the question of what constitutes environmental harm is a splendid swirling nexus of science, ethics and politics. And that in this complexity, there is much we can learn from being attentive to waterfleas, whales and bees. Indeed, to all the other species we share this extraordinary planet with.

Fern Wickson is an Australian citizen who has been living in Norway for over a decade. She is a Research Professor of Environmental Governance and holds an interdisciplinary PhD across biology and political science. Her work has focused on the science/policy interface and specifically, the integration of science, indigenous knowledge, stakeholder views and environmental philosophy in the pursuit of sustainable food systems.

Dr. Fern Wickson is the Scientific Secretary of the North Atlantic Marine Mammal Commission (NAMMCO) and a Senior Advisor at GenØk Centre for Biosafety in Tromsø, Norway. Committed to ecological ethics and a politics of socio-ecological care, the primary objective of her work has been to advance sustainability in food systems and responsibility in research and innovation arenas.

Fern has served as an expert delegate to the Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) working group on the diverse conceptualization of values in nature. She is also a member of the Norwegian Biotechnology Advisory Board and past President of the international Society for the Study of New and Emerging Technologies (S.Net).

In her spare time, Fern enjoys hiking, snowboarding, kayaking and trying to grow her own food. She is also a yoga and meditation teacher and runs her own studio in Tromsø called The Peaceful Wild.

Gísli PálssonGísli Pálsson

Gísli Pálsson

Epistemic Landscapes for the Century of Life

The last century has been variously named the century of genetics, biology, and the gene. The 21st Century, in contrast, seems primarily associated with life and the environment. Such a shift, I argue, has at least two kinds of momentum. On the one hand, it continues from recent concepts of ‘local biologies’, ‘body worlds’, and ‘biosocial relations’, conflating genomes, organisms, and context, erasing the boundaries between inside and outside the organism. On the other hand, it recognizes an emergent momentum in the history of life, characterized by the alarming threat of mass extinction as a result of human activities, witnessed by a recent UN report. Probing the advent and implications of the ‘environment’ is at the core of the growing field of ‘epigenetics’, identified by Conrad Waddington in the 1940s. Applying Waddington’s visualization of epigenetic landscape to epistemic shifts in the century of life – partly turning Waddington on Waddington – I suggest one may interrogate the development of the notions of ‘epigenome’ for the purpose of understanding and respecting ‘life itself’ in the current century of life.

Gísli Pálsson is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Iceland. He has written extensively on a variety of issues, including human-environmental relations, slavery, biomedicine, and genomics. He has done fieldwork in Iceland, the Republic of Cape Verde, the Canadian Arctic, and the Virgin Islands. He is the author, editor, or co-editor of many books, including Anthropology and the New Genetics (2007); Biosocial Becomings: Integrating Social and Biological Anthropology, co-edited with Tim Ingold (2013), Nature, Culture, and Society: Anthropological Perspectives on Life (2016), Can Science Solve the Nature/Nurture Debate?, with Margaret Lock (2016), and The Man Who Stole Himself (2016).

Pálsson has a keen interest in photography and human/other-than-human relations. Recently he has embarked on a new project that combines scholarship and the arts, science and history: the fate of the Great Auk (Penguinus impennis), which became extinct by the mid-19th century.

Linkt to ISHPSSB's website

TM logo svart900l  uio life science 900 FR logo Eng sort uio 2